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  • July 13, 2024, 07:02:41 AM

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Author Topic: Esc overheating  (Read 231 times)

Offline JohnCallentine

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Esc overheating
« on: July 07, 2024, 07:17:46 PM »
I'm having a problem with my new plane. The esc is getting up to 220 degrees and shutting
 off. I guess I'll have to cut another hole but I'm wondering what are some other factors besides airflow that contribute to the temperature an esc runs. I've only been doing 2 minute test flights. Flew it with the cowl off and it ran 185.

Offline Dennis Toth

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Re: Esc overheating
« Reply #1 on: July 07, 2024, 07:58:23 PM »
John,
Sounds like you are pulling a lot of amps. What motor, prop, rpm, ESC, battery and model weight are you using it in? Check the motor timing setting in the ESC and the PPW (lower runs cooler).

I like to run my amps around 60% of the ESC rating. If you're running up near the limit it can push the temps up. If the amps are high your options are reduce the prop diameter and adjust the pitch to maintain lap time (diameter drag is a squared function, pitch is close to linear).

Also, make sure the leadouts are not to far back as it creates a lot of drag and draws more amps. This is a starting point so others may have additional information.

Best,     DennisT

Online Ken Culbertson

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Re: Esc overheating
« Reply #2 on: July 07, 2024, 09:56:22 PM »
Dennis is correct.  Too small of an ESC is bad. I have never had an ESC cooling problem because I always go big on the amps.  I fly 35 amps on the 23xx motors, 50 amps on the 28xx and 65 amps on the 35xx motors.  Yes it is $$$ but in a full body it is really cramped and having to cool the esc means positioning it in airflow.  My planes are drag queens, no not that kind, and use a lot of battery.  I put too much time into building a plane to lose it to an overheated esc shutting me off.

Another thing to look for is a dead spot in your airflow.  I just had a lesson from an expert in engine cowling coaching me on how to keep the air moving through the fuselage.  We build these tunnels then fill them up and still expect the air to flow.  Draw up a cross section where all of you junk is, battery, esc, timer wires, etc. and see just how mush free space there is for air to flow.  That becomes the maximum size of your intake (scoop, etc.).  The exit for the air needs to be as far behind that spot as feasible and at least 2x the intake area.  3x is better.  If you are getting more air in than can get past the obstacles, you build up a stagnant area around the ESC and battery and the heat is not being carried off.

Ken
AMA 15382
If it is not broke you are not trying hard enough.
USAF 1968-1974 TAC

Offline JohnCallentine

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Re: Esc overheating
« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2024, 09:00:48 PM »
Thanks for the replies. I'm using a Badass 2826, Castle Edge Lt 50, apc 12-6,model weighs 66oz. 650 sq in. Max amp draw is 35 at take off, around 25 or so during flight.  PPW is 8.

Online Ken Culbertson

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Re: Esc overheating
« Reply #4 on: July 09, 2024, 12:29:46 AM »
I am assuming you have the 2826-820 and are using a 5s battery.  Sounds to me like one of two possibilities.  66oz is a bit much for a 2826 but not over the top.  The CC 50 is the right EXC for that motor.  However, combined with a 12-6 prop you might be stressing the esc to feed the motor.  On the other hand, you are only running 2 min and overheating.  Might try a lower pitch or smaller diameter prop.  IMHO, it is the cowling.  Something is causing the airflow around the ESC to not move fast enough.  Just out of curiosity, is the battery also hot and the motor?
AMA 15382
If it is not broke you are not trying hard enough.
USAF 1968-1974 TAC


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