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  • April 13, 2021, 09:15:43 PM

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Author Topic: Wing Sheeting  (Read 411 times)

Offline Joe Rice

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Wing Sheeting
« on: April 07, 2021, 04:51:21 AM »
I am interested to hear some techniques forsdhering leading and trailing edge wing sheeting.  I have used Titebond with tape and pins.  I want to try CA, but can't figure out how to do the blind side once one side is sheeted.
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Offline Joe Rice

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Re: Wing Sheeting
« Reply #1 on: April 07, 2021, 05:24:53 AM »
I modified my search and found some good info from a few years back.  Several posts similar to my process so I'll stick to that (no pun intended)
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Offline Ken Culbertson

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Re: Wing Sheeting
« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2021, 10:22:08 AM »
I am interested to hear some techniques forsdhering leading and trailing edge wing sheeting.  I have used Titebond with tape and pins.  I want to try CA, but can't figure out how to do the blind side once one side is sheeted.
Stay with the Titebond but,  I think a lot depends on the spar.  If it is classic "D" tube you don't have any access to the LE from inside.  If it is "C" tube you can use CA with long dispenser tips successfully.  I use CA as "liquid pins" to tack the sheeting to the spar from the top.  Since I leave a 1/16" or so gap for the cap strips it is pretty easy to tack it down after you tape it to get rid of any slack.  CA will run down a joint for a very long distance.  The 3-4" of the LE planking is well within that distance. This works with molded LE's as well.  Add the webbing after the planking is on.  All of this can be done on a "rod" jig by flipping the wing over after you have tack glued to the spar and tilting the jig so that the CA can run down the joint.  OR:

Just use Titebond and work on the fuselage while it dries.

Ken

Thinking about this brought back some FF memories.  I built a lot of 1/2a and A-1, A-2 wings.  Before covering (including doping the structure) we would soak them and pin then to the workbench with the desired tip washout.  When they dried, they were much less prone to warps.  I assume because all of the internal tension in the wood relaxed.  Could that be done with a PA wing?
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Online Steve Berry

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Re: Wing Sheeting
« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2021, 05:42:33 PM »
Before covering (including doping the structure) we would soak them and pin then to the workbench with the desired tip washout.  When they dried, they were much less prone to warps.  I assume because all of the internal tension in the wood relaxed.  Could that be done with a PA wing?

This would definitely require either a full size tub or swimming pool in order submerge the entire wing at once. Plus nerves of steel to get your brand new perfect stunt wing completely soaked and trust that it won't turn into a potato chip. That doesn't count what could happen to the bellcrank and associated hardware.  I wouldn't do it, personally, but I applaud anyone who is willing to give it a try.

Steve


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