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Author Topic: Flying the Cox Planes  (Read 1831 times)

Offline David Hourston

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Flying the Cox Planes
« on: February 08, 2023, 08:48:33 AM »
Hi,

Iím a newbie to CL. I just flew a .049 Cox Cessna 150 and really enjoyed it so Iíll be flying more CL.
Iíll be flying the Cox Cessna 150 and other Cox planes like the Stuka, Super Chipmunk and Hyper Viper as I progress.

Iíve a couple of questions:

Iím using Power Pro 10lb braided line as flyline (I also have  Power Pro 20lb if better).  Is Power Pro equivalent to the Spiderwire brand?

Should I use leadouts or can attach the braided line directly to the bellcrank as shown in the picture?

Thanks.



« Last Edit: February 08, 2023, 09:21:27 AM by David Hourston »
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Offline Larry Renger

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2023, 09:41:37 AM »
10 lb is just fine and tieing directly to the bellcrank is good.   H^^
Think S.M.A.L.L. y'all and, it's all good, CL, FF and RC!

DesignMan
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Offline David Hourston

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2023, 10:05:22 AM »
10 lb is just fine and tieing directly to the bellcrank is good.   H^^

Thanks Larry.

The plane flies very well. Great design!
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Offline David Hourston

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #3 on: February 14, 2023, 01:29:22 PM »
Made a video of me flying the Cessna 150. I know lol  #^

Davehour flying his 1974 Cox Cessna 150 control line model
« Last Edit: February 14, 2023, 03:10:46 PM by David Hourston »
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Offline john e. holliday

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #4 on: February 14, 2023, 02:34:03 PM »
That does bring back memories of helping people with their Cox planes.  One Christmas my brother got me the F-100 Saber Jet with the cox 020 engine.  Soon as dinner was over we went to the school yard and flew it. D>K
John E. "DOC" Holliday
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Offline Mark Mc

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #5 on: February 14, 2023, 05:28:18 PM »
Made a video of me flying the Cessna 150. I know lol  #^

They must really hate people flying model airplanes where you are for you to have to sneak out at 3 in the morning to fly...

Offline David Hourston

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #6 on: February 15, 2023, 03:50:38 AM »
They must really hate people flying model airplanes where you are for you to have to sneak out at 3 in the morning to fly...

LOL
Actually, it was 11:30pm my time.
Iím flying at nights because it has been very windy during the days.
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Online Dave Hull

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #7 on: February 15, 2023, 11:15:37 PM »
Hours,

What you got goin' on there is the beginnings of a control line "street takeover." Now you just need a bunch of fans taking selfies and smoke videos and you're all set! Better have a few extra planes though, because there's always crashes at takeovers....

Good to see guys out (at any time of the night) having fun.

The Divot


Offline David Hourston

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #8 on: February 16, 2023, 03:46:41 AM »
Hours,

What you got goin' on there is the beginnings of a control line "street takeover." Now you just need a bunch of fans taking selfies and smoke videos and you're all set! Better have a few extra planes though, because there's always crashes at takeovers....

Good to see guys out (at any time of the night) having fun.

The Divot

They are watching and getting closer  :)
Cox Models! Best hobby memories...

Offline kevin king

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #9 on: February 20, 2023, 12:59:37 PM »
Made a video of me flying the Cessna 150. I know lol  #^

Davehour flying his 1974 Cox Cessna 150 control line model

I like that plane. Shows up well against the night sky too 👍

Offline David Hourston

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #10 on: February 20, 2023, 07:18:58 PM »
I like that plane. Shows up well against the night sky too 👍

Hi Kevin,

Thanks for your comments. Mean a lot.

Iíve been working with the Cox Super Chipmunk (solid wing version). Itís ready for break-in and fly.

The decals were peeling off due to their age. Sealed the edge of the fuselage ones with natural color nail polish. And the ones on the wing with thin foam safe CA.

I also drilled a hole in the bellcrank to reduce elevator throw for the first flights.

Iíll use 30í (instead of the common 35í) control lines due to the space limitation were Iím flying.

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Offline Walter Hicks

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #11 on: February 20, 2023, 09:25:50 PM »
Dave I have flown my Cox chipmunk recently I got a bite dizzy on the shorter lines , it does fly very well. ( I did use a different prop an apc prop that allowed the engine to run up more) . I think my lines were around 28 feet to 30 feet. Planes flies really easy compared to other Cox planes.

Offline David Hourston

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #12 on: February 20, 2023, 09:54:15 PM »
Dave I have flown my Cox chipmunk recently I got a bite dizzy on the shorter lines , it does fly very well. ( I did use a different prop an apc prop that allowed the engine to run up more) . I think my lines were around 28 feet to 30 feet. Planes flies really easy compared to other Cox planes.

Walter,

Good to know, thank you.
Did you do some stunts on that setup?
Do you think itís ok for me to leave full elevator throw?
« Last Edit: February 21, 2023, 06:33:03 AM by David Hourston »
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Offline Larry Renger

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #13 on: February 21, 2023, 06:49:51 AM »
If you have room, 35í of 10 lb spiderwire will work great.
Think S.M.A.L.L. y'all and, it's all good, CL, FF and RC!

DesignMan
 BTW, Dracula Sucks!  A closed mouth gathers no feet!

Offline David Hourston

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #14 on: February 21, 2023, 09:30:37 AM »
If you have room, 35í of 10 lb spiderwire will work great.

Larry,

I donít think Iíll be able to go 35í. Maybe 31í at the most.
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Offline Walter Hicks

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #15 on: February 21, 2023, 08:23:14 PM »
Dave I left the elevator stock , and yes I did some loops ( very big be careful) .

Offline David Hourston

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #16 on: February 22, 2023, 01:32:40 AM »
If you have room, 35í of 10 lb spiderwire will work great.

Larry,

I donít think Iíll be able to go 35í. Maybe 31í at the most.

Besides faster laps, what other adverse effects 30í will have?

How does it flying compare to the Hyper Viper?

Can it be flown over short grass?
Cox Models! Best hobby memories...

Offline David Hourston

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #17 on: February 22, 2023, 01:39:52 AM »
Dave I left the elevator stock , and yes I did some loops ( very big be careful) .

Gotcha!
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Offline Larry Renger

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #18 on: February 25, 2023, 05:27:59 AM »
The Chipmunk and Hyper Viper fly just about the same. Longer lines give more room to maneuver.
Think S.M.A.L.L. y'all and, it's all good, CL, FF and RC!

DesignMan
 BTW, Dracula Sucks!  A closed mouth gathers no feet!

Offline David Hourston

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #19 on: February 25, 2023, 05:54:54 AM »
The Chipmunk and Hyper Viper fly just about the same. Longer lines give more room to maneuver.

Thanks.  :)

Are both intermediate stunt flyers?

How do they compared to a sport balsa model?

Whatís the capacity of their fuel tanks?
Cox Models! Best hobby memories...

Offline Larry Renger

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #20 on: February 26, 2023, 06:13:32 AM »
On longer lines, both will do all the pattern maneuvers. But larger than competition specs.

A good balsa model will easily outfly either Cox plane. RSM Pinto, RSM SKY Sport or Brodak Stork with a Tee Dee .049 all can do a competition grade pattern.
Think S.M.A.L.L. y'all and, it's all good, CL, FF and RC!

DesignMan
 BTW, Dracula Sucks!  A closed mouth gathers no feet!

Offline David Hourston

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #21 on: February 26, 2023, 10:43:50 AM »
On longer lines, both will do all the pattern maneuvers. But larger than competition specs.

A good balsa model will easily outfly either Cox plane. RSM Pinto, RSM SKY Sport or Brodak Stork with a Tee Dee .049 all can do a competition grade pattern.

Thanks for the information.

Is a Killer Bee a good upgrade for both models?
Will it make a significant improvement?

My intention is to keep flying the Cox models and see how it goes. Then move on, if this is the correct way to go.
Cox Models! Best hobby memories...

Offline Larry Renger

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #22 on: February 27, 2023, 06:25:46 AM »
An original Killer Bee would add power. At the end of Cox they were putting out simple product engines and labeling them as Killer Bees.
Think S.M.A.L.L. y'all and, it's all good, CL, FF and RC!

DesignMan
 BTW, Dracula Sucks!  A closed mouth gathers no feet!

Offline Leonard Duke

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #23 on: March 06, 2023, 11:03:16 AM »
The Cox WWII fighters are a handful to fly due to the weight and smaller wings. Good Luck! It takes a lot of speed to get them in the air and I remember them as not very responsive. Harry Higley's book, Flying Around, does a good friendly job of analyzing the reasons why. Flying all the Cox planes sounds like a cool project though. Lighter models with larger wings are much easier to learn stunting on.

Offline 944_Jim

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #24 on: March 06, 2023, 02:52:00 PM »

The decals were peeling off due to their age. Sealed the edge of the fuselage ones with natural color nail polish.


Wait a minute...nail polish is fuel proof?

Offline David Hourston

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #25 on: March 08, 2023, 03:40:24 AM »
Wait a minute...nail polish is fuel proof?

No, but itís fuel resistant and oil proof, though.

Iíve found itís effective against the oil splash from the engine exhaust and holds well to short exposure to fuel.
Itís a good alternative when there isnít a good one on hand and it hides fairly well after applied.
Cox Models! Best hobby memories...

Offline Dan McEntee

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #26 on: March 08, 2023, 07:43:40 PM »
The Cox WWII fighters are a handful to fly due to the weight and smaller wings. Good Luck! It takes a lot of speed to get them in the air and I remember them as not very responsive. Harry Higley's book, Flying Around, does a good friendly job of analyzing the reasons why. Flying all the Cox planes sounds like a cool project though. Lighter models with larger wings are much easier to learn stunting on.

      I have flown many of the Cox planes. If they had one major flaw, it's the under cambered wing, but that was necessary for production. The bad reputation for them largely comes from that fact that not everyone can fly a control line model, and most people started out with the wrong airplane and never read instructions. I suffered from that when my Mom finally succumbed to my plea and got me a Cox Stuka for Christmas as a kid. I had been building free flight models and such but had not built a c/l trainer. I tried the Stuka with no help, and got the typical results. The whole story is up in the "How I Got My Start" section of the forum. I managed to put together the funds for a Sterling Beginner Mustang, mounted the Cox baby Bee that came of a Curtis Pusher that was my Dad's, and with no money left for Dope but the left over fuel from the Cox starter kit that came with the Stuka, I got my first flights with that model. The Cox models do fly, but the scale models needs some one at the handle with some experience. The PT-19 would let you build up that experience if you had the patience to stick with it and learn. Once I had some time under my belt, I had no problem flying the plastic ready to fly scale models because I figured out that you have to fly them ALL THE TIME! here are some videos from recent history to prove the point. These are stock, Cox plastic RTFs, on regular Cox 15% fuel.  Neither model is underpowered at all, if anything, maybe too much power for a small child.
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Offline David Hourston

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #27 on: March 09, 2023, 03:36:59 AM »
      I have flown many of the Cox planes. If they had one major flaw, it's the under cambered wing, but that was necessary for production. The bad reputation for them largely comes from that fact that not everyone can fly a control line model, and most people started out with the wrong airplane and never read instructions. I suffered from that when my Mom finally succumbed to my plea and got me a Cox Stuka for Christmas as a kid. I had been building free flight models and such but had not built a c/l trainer. I tried the Stuka with no help, and got the typical results. The whole story is up in the "How I Got My Start" section of the forum. I managed to put together the funds for a Sterling Beginner Mustang, mounted the Cox baby Bee that came of a Curtis Pusher that was my Dad's, and with no money left for Dope but the left over fuel from the Cox starter kit that came with the Stuka, I got my first flights with that model. The Cox models do fly, but the scale models needs some one at the handle with some experience. The PT-19 would let you build up that experience if you had the patience to stick with it and learn. Once I had some time under my belt, I had no problem flying the plastic ready to fly scale models because I figured out that you have to fly them ALL THE TIME! here are some videos from recent history to prove the point. These are stock, Cox plastic RTFs, on regular Cox 15% fuel.  Neither model is underpowered at all, if anything, maybe too much power for a small child.
  Type at you later,
  Dan McEntee


Hello Dan,

Thanks for stopping by and share your story.

I saw your video before and loved it!; as much as I do now watching it again. As a manner of fact, I have the video saved as one of my Cox reference ones.

I also had a Stuka when I was a kid. I only could enjoy starting it and never got to fly it. Well, now that got one recently, itís on the ďwaiting listĒ and will be flown with a lot of enthusiasm.

What Iím missing is a starting kit from that time as later Cox stating kits didnít smell like the one I bought at that time (e.g. kit 330 vs 400), as I was able to get a NOS sealed 400 kit from 1985. I have that peculiar smell in my mind and want to smell it again. As soon as I can find one 330 kit sealed, Iíll fly the Stuka. In case the fuel isnít good anymore, at least I can smell and feel the Cox fuel of such time again. And I might try reviving it by mixing it with some of the fresh Iím using presently which is from Brodak, 25% 1/2A blend.

Attached are pictures of my Cox collection and the starting kit Iím looking for.

Cox Models! Best hobby memories...

Offline David Hourston

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #28 on: March 13, 2023, 04:21:48 PM »
Hi all,

Hereís a video of me flying a 1991 Cox Super Chipmunk. Still learning.

The planes flies well and has good aerobatics teaching capabilities.

Will aim the cell better in future videos :).

Engine couldnít be kept leaned properly due to vibrations caused by a loose fit of the engine plastic mount which is clamped to molded female receptors in the upper and lower fuselage parts, causing the needle valve to turn and richening the mixture during the flight. Iíll correct the loose fit and will use a better propeller than stock which flex considerably.

« Last Edit: March 14, 2023, 08:57:05 AM by David Hourston »
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Offline Dan McEntee

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #29 on: March 13, 2023, 08:47:39 PM »
 Hey Mark;
    I can't remember if those engines have the black sleeve to seal the needle at the spray bar or not. They get loose and can leak air. A simple hit with a heat gun can shrink it, or try a short length of fuel line. That will help stabilize the needle. For a prop, try a three blade with the smooth tips from one of the Cox Warbirds. I think that was the hot set up for the Cox stunt models. As soon as Spring finally arrives, I may have to get some of mine out!!
  Goes yours have the spot for the wing tip weight? If so, then the leadouts should be where they need to be. The articles that Ted Fancher did for his column were in the 1896 area I think. Search it out on here or the main forum, I'm sure it has been brought up and discussed before. 
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Offline David Hourston

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #30 on: March 14, 2023, 07:19:09 AM »
Hey Mark;
    I can't remember if those engines have the black sleeve to seal the needle at the spray bar or not. They get loose and can leak air. A simple hit with a heat gun can shrink it, or try a short length of fuel line. That will help stabilize the needle. For a prop, try a three blade with the smooth tips from one of the Cox Warbirds. I think that was the hot set up for the Cox stunt models. As soon as Spring finally arrives, I may have to get some of mine out!!
  Goes yours have the spot for the wing tip weight? If so, then the leadouts should be where they need to be. The articles that Ted Fancher did for his column were in the 1896 area I think. Search it out on here or the main forum, I'm sure it has been brought up and discussed before. 
   Type at you later,
   Dan McEntee

Dan,

The engine doesnít have the sleeve. Iíll install a fuel line. Should help.

I ordered some stiffer and composite props (Cox .049 .051 Airplane Engine 6 x 3 Competition Propeller Prop 049 051 gray and J&Z Zingali 6x3 PROPELLER Prop #090 Composite Zinger 6x3). Are any of these any good?

https://www.ebay.com/itm/283987159515?mkcid=16&mkevt=1&mkrid=711-127632-2357-0&ssspo=2T38jxGIQY6&sssrc=2349624&ssuid=47yYL9tNTA-&var=&widget_ver=artemis&media=COPY

https://www.ebay.com/itm/283802435297?mkcid=16&mkevt=1&mkrid=711-127632-2357-0&ssspo=MyejF5EnSQS&sssrc=2349624&ssuid=47yYL9tNTA-&var=&widget_ver=artemis&media=COPY

The wing has the weights.

Iíll use epoxy or similar to fill the gaps in the fuselage engine clamp area to decrease engine loose fit.

I read someplace Cox incorporated the recommendations that Ted Fancher mentioned in his article.
Cox Models! Best hobby memories...


Offline Walter Hicks

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #32 on: March 14, 2023, 06:58:37 PM »
APC 5.7x3 prop way better than 6x3 prop . My Chipmunk was much better with that prop.

Offline David Hourston

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #33 on: March 14, 2023, 08:19:06 PM »
APC 5.7x3 prop way better than 6x3 prop . My Chipmunk was much better with that prop.

Walter,

Ordered some. Thanks.
Cox Models! Best hobby memories...

Offline Dan McEntee

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #34 on: March 14, 2023, 10:44:51 PM »
Hello guys,

Found the article from the Model Aviation Magazine Library: Jan 1989; pages 74, 181, 183 & 183.

Magazine Index:
https://library.modelaviation.com/edition/model-aviation-198901

Cover:
https://library-modelaviation.s3.us-east-2.amazonaws.com/styles/full_page/s3/ma/ma198901/ma198901_001.jpg

Contents:
https://library-modelaviation.s3.us-east-2.amazonaws.com/styles/full_page/s3/ma/ma198901/ma198901_005.jpg

Page 74:
https://library-modelaviation.s3.us-east-2.amazonaws.com/styles/full_page/s3/ma/ma198901/ma198901_076.jpg

Page 181:
https://library-modelaviation.s3.us-east-2.amazonaws.com/styles/full_page/s3/ma/ma198901/ma198901_183.jpg

Page 182:
https://library-modelaviation.s3.us-east-2.amazonaws.com/styles/full_page/s3/ma/ma198901/ma198901_184.jpg

Page 183:
https://library-modelaviation.s3.us-east-2.amazonaws.com/styles/full_page/s3/ma/ma198901/ma198901_185.jpg

Made a low quality pdf to post it here.

    Boy!! I goofed up the date on my last post!! I'm not really sure but I think Ted may have done a follow up in the newer later on. I think Cox even gave the newer version a different part number also.  Back then, a fellow named Bob Rogers up in Quincy IL put on a stunt contest and liked to do different odd ball things as an attraction in between rounds. One year he had a mini contest in between rounds flying these Cox stunters. It was one round, flying the beginner pattern. I had been flying mine a lot, and had a lot of time on the earlier versions, so was used to them. I won mainly because I was the only one that got a complete flight!! For what they are, they are a neat airplane.

    There have been reams of paper used and millions of bits of band width consumed writing about how to get newbies, especially kids, interested in flying control line and the question always comes up, why can't they come up with something cheap and easy to fly to sell at Wal-Mart to appeal to the masses. Well, in my humble opinion,  this Chipmunk/ME-109 was about as close to that as you can get. Even though it's a stunt model, it was pretty stable and would groove level flight pretty well. It had what the other plastic RTF's didn't have and that was the symmetrical wing. It wouldn't take too much engineering to have made this airplane to be held together with rubber bands. Fast forward to today's markets, it would have to be electric, and the question there is, could that be done at the same wing loading and fly with the performance that equaled the .049 versions?? Could it be produced and marketed at a competitive price? Would kids or their parents even give it a second look?  As much as I LOVED the PT-19, it still needed to be started first. Once in the air, it flew OK and would even loop, I know because I've done it!! The under cambered wing is what gives it some characteristics that make it funky to some and I guess that is why it has the full flying stab, so it would respond better and faster. Who would be willing to produce and electric version of the Chipmunk/ME-109, redesigned to pop apart on crashes, with a two speed option for power (a slower speed for round and round training, higher speed for stunts) capable of the beginner pattern in the proper mode, and designed to appeal to "I gotta have it now" generation?
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Offline David Hourston

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #35 on: March 15, 2023, 04:45:50 AM »
APC 5.7x3 prop way better than 6x3 prop . My Chipmunk was much better with that prop.

Walter,

Is the engine fit in your Chipmunk loose?
Cox Models! Best hobby memories...

Offline Dan McEntee

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #36 on: March 15, 2023, 08:49:50 AM »
  David;
  What kind of lines are you flying on with your Chipmunk? The new fishing lines should be of some advantage along with a better prop.
  Type at you later,
  Dan McEntee
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Offline David Hourston

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #37 on: March 15, 2023, 10:21:18 AM »
  David;
  What kind of lines are you flying on with your Chipmunk? The new fishing lines should be of some advantage along with a better prop.
  Type at you later,
  Dan McEntee

Dan,

Iím using PowePro 10lb lines.
Cox Models! Best hobby memories...

Offline Mark Mc

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #38 on: March 15, 2023, 11:46:44 AM »
The Cox WWII fighters are a handful to fly due to the weight and smaller wings. Good Luck! It takes a lot of speed to get them in the air and I remember them as not very responsive. Harry Higley's book, Flying Around, does a good friendly job of analyzing the reasons why. Flying all the Cox planes sounds like a cool project though. Lighter models with larger wings are much easier to learn stunting on.

When I was a kid I bought a Sopwith Camel with my allowance.  I just couldn't control it.  I eventually just pulled off the upper wing and it flew fine, if a little fast, after that.

Mark

Offline Dan McEntee

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #39 on: March 15, 2023, 01:33:25 PM »
When I was a kid I bought a Sopwith Camel with my allowance.  I just couldn't control it.  I eventually just pulled off the upper wing and it flew fine, if a little fast, after that.

Mark

     The alignment of both wings on a biplane is critical. I think it was John Miller that posted in a thread to have the bottom wing at zero with the thrust line, and the top wing should be at -1 degree at least and I guess that is to counter the drag that high above the CG. Some positive stab angle would help also. I remember flying the WW-1 models for other guys and just remember them as being "typical Cox." But when you look at how they were assembled, the top wing could be pointed anywhere!! And my guess is that this is the major issue with them, and the Testors biplanes. I tried to fly a Testors Camel, and it just did what it wanted to do, absolutely no control. But they look better than the Cox versions do I think.
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Offline David Hourston

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #40 on: March 16, 2023, 06:05:31 AM »
APC 5.7x3 prop way better than 6x3 prop . My Chipmunk was much better with that prop.

Hi Walter,

These are the ones I ordered:

https://www.apcprop.com/product/5-7x3/

Are these the correct ones?
Do the bushings set they come with fit the cox shaft?

David
Cox Models! Best hobby memories...

Offline Walter Hicks

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #41 on: March 18, 2023, 01:30:49 AM »
Dave, YES and NO The prop is correct and the motor is not loose in the Chipmunk. Off the subject but I purchased off eBay a Cox Stuka for $80
including shipping. I spent another $40 for decals, a bell crank and pushrod and exhaust stacks. I bought this one to fly it as I have another that I got quite a few years ago that is mostly complete. this one has one part of the canopy missing and no pilots or seats guns etc. It looked good on the picture
that was posted on Ebay. When I got it It looked even better. took the engine and tank out appears to have never been run!!!!!

I also purchased an Aero Cub to fly. My first Cox plane was the Red and White Super Cub 150 with the Baby Bee. I have one in excellent shape hanging in my shop. But will not fly it. I will fly the Orange Aero Cub like Dan who posted the videos . Keep posting on the Cox planes they are really fun to
mess with. I am an Advanced level Stunt flyer who completes but have just as much or more fun with the Cox planes

Offline David Hourston

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #42 on: March 18, 2023, 07:35:12 AM »
Dave, YES and NO The prop is correct and the motor is not loose in the Chipmunk. Off the subject but I purchased off eBay a Cox Stuka for $80
including shipping. I spent another $40 for decals, a bell crank and pushrod and exhaust stacks. I bought this one to fly it as I have another that I got quite a few years ago that is mostly complete. this one has one part of the canopy missing and no pilots or seats guns etc. It looked good on the picture
that was posted on Ebay. When I got it It looked even better. took the engine and tank out appears to have never been run!!!!!

I also purchased an Aero Cub to fly. My first Cox plane was the Red and White Super Cub 150 with the Baby Bee. I have one in excellent shape hanging in my shop. But will not fly it. I will fly the Orange Aero Cub like Dan who posted the videos . Keep posting on the Cox planes they are really fun to
mess with. I am an Advanced level Stunt flyer who completes but have just as much or more fun with the Cox planes

Walter,

Thatís a fantastic deal!
I purchased a NIB Stuka for much more than that. I havenít flown it yet.

I found the upper fuselage engine molded female receptors broken. This is the reason the engine fit is loose. Iíll use epoxy to fix and reinforce the mount. I hope the repair is good and durable.
Cox Models! Best hobby memories...

Offline Dan McEntee

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #43 on: March 18, 2023, 09:33:29 AM »
Walter,

Thatís a fantastic deal!
I purchased a NIB Stuka for much more than that. I havenít flown it yet.

I found the upper fuselage engine molded female receptors broken. This is the reason the engine fit is loose. Iíll use epoxy to fix and reinforce the mount. I hope the repair is good and durable.

   The Stuka I fly in the video had to have the engine mounts rebuilt. I used old credit cards for the material, and hobby shops have sheet styrene materials also. I just used regular liquid plastic model cement and epoxy. Another way to make things a bit more slid is to just take dabs of silicane and glue the engine in. It can be worked loose again later if you need to take it apart. On my Stuka, I used clear plastic box tape to help hold on the canopy sections also. On the Stuka and Spitfire, which also had a sliding canopy, they would blow off from the prop blast and get stepped on or lost, and that is why most that you see available don't have them.

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Offline George Fruhling

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Re: Flying the Cox Planes
« Reply #44 on: March 19, 2023, 10:25:36 PM »
The Cox Me 109 super stunter was a good flying model.  Someone showed up at the flying field with one circa 1977 and saw me flying something. Maybe a Banshee.  He couldn't fly so he asked me to take it up.  Inside loops, lazy 8's  and inverted flight were not a problem.  The foam wings were a bit fragile so it's not a bare beginner plane but you look like you could handle it.   Braided lines are much better than the dacron included with Cox half a planes.


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