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  • November 28, 2020, 12:49:03 AM

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Author Topic: Three Surface Stunter  (Read 3672 times)

Offline Wolfgang Nieuwkamp

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Re: Three Surface Stunter
« Reply #50 on: September 23, 2019, 02:18:13 PM »
Just to get an idea regarding the influence of the front wing on the main wing, I did a quick and dirty analysis with the program FLZ Vortex.



XS= Center of Gravity
XN =Neutral point
XD= Pressure point.

The small triangles are bubble separation warnings. Maybe I should place some vortex generators on the indicated locations...
Fliegt video will be made this weekend, depending on the weather.

Regards,

Wolfgang


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Re: Three Surface Stunter
« Reply #51 on: September 29, 2019, 06:32:36 PM »
Found this picture when looking for something else . Might be good for styling with the electric .


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Offline phil c

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Re: Three Surface Stunter
« Reply #53 on: January 31, 2020, 04:35:25 PM »
This thread is about canards, but it might lend some insight into what happens as the airplane layout changes.
The two pictures show that max performance occurs with roughly 30-35% tail area(as a % to total area).
I've only tried that big a tail on one plane, and it was a profile carrier.


https://stunthanger.com/smf/stunt-design/mid-engine-canard/msg485836/#msg485836
phil Cartier

Offline Wolfgang Nieuwkamp

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Re: Three Surface Stunter
« Reply #54 on: February 01, 2020, 12:33:23 PM »
Phil,

according to Fraserīs article, the tailplane size can be chosen freely, adapting the CG.
Equation (13) gives the location of the neutral point. The CG should be 8% of x12 ahead of that neutral point.

It works, even for tandem airplanes.

Regards,

Wolfgang.

The article is too large to attach, so here is the link:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/phes1fzvact9ez7/Fraser%20Stability.pdf?dl=0


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Tags: tsa canard