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Author Topic: ' B ' ginnings  (Read 68007 times)

Offline Air Ministry .

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' B ' ginnings
« on: June 17, 2024, 10:44:44 PM »
Dunno if its a load of tripe . Early days of B in the U S . Bob Lutz . Aeromodelor 1956 .

https://rcbookcase.com/details.php?publication_id=403

the race ' stratagy ' of running the events intresting . Could ' fill out ' the day and make a event of it , even with a handfull of entries . PERHAPS ?

I cand cut & glue it - If one of you has the time & the inclination , pages 662 & 663 HERE please . !Ive been inclined to try building one from his drawing .
Vintage & classic B are popular in the English speaking countries  . Stropping along at 90 on a old Fox or Torpedo , rather than a modern schneurle , if the NOISE wasnt a issue , would give them a canter .

Online C.T. Schaefer

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Re: ' B ' ginnings
« Reply #1 on: June 24, 2024, 05:19:18 AM »
There is a great set of rules here for just that. All we need are a few more folks who are interested.  Reality.  Good idea but most of us are 'aged out'!

Offline Air Ministry .

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Re: ' B ' ginnings
« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2024, 10:16:15 PM »
ALLWAYS WONDERED if this was tecnically exact , or thearter . ANYONE know if that IS how it was ?? sounds like a good way for a ' sports day ' to string it out and getta bitta tension & drama , build up        they call it ? .

copyed but spelink aint orl kright .

662T e a m   It a e in g .  U .S .A .  s t y l eby  Bob  Lutkerhenneth  Mur»»,  left, u f Galetburg.  lUinol·,  trinner  o f thi·  year tf 954 l'..S'. Motional»  Tram  Haring  Event  bring  /.retrain!  uith  thefamed F.A.S.T. Clul. Perpetual Train Raring Trophy. Pret rntaliunit  mail··  by  an  Admiral o f thr  I'.S.  Very. The  \avy  i· hntl  toI hr  SallonaltThfo r i g i no fTeam Racing dates hack prior  to 1950 when some of the top California speed flyers of the  famed  F.A.S.T.  Club  began  racing  semi-scale models in team competition over a ten  mile course. The event was patterned after the  famous  Good- vear Trophy Races that were so popular in  American aviation  in past  years.  Rules  were  established  to govern Team Racing, and as interest in  the event grew, races were being run regularly.  Basically those same rules still exist today, with a few  modifications throughout  the  years.  The  following  is  an  excerpt from  the  Academy  of  Model  Aeronautics  model aircraft regulations setting forth the objective of this event. “ It is the purpose of Team Racing to flv semi­scale,  realistic  airplanes  in  direct  competition through  a  series  of  beat  races  leading  to  a  feature race for the  most consistent racers of the day.” Here  we  have  the  makings  of  an  exciting  and fascinating  model  competition. The  event  was  first introduced  in  U.S.  National  competition  at  our 1950  National  Championships  at  Dallas,  Texas. That  first  year  there  were  few  entries,  but  the apparent  interest  in  Team  Racing  was  high.  The following  year,  at  the  1951  Nationals,  again  at Dallas,  it  was  my  good  fortune  to win  first  place, finishing  the  ten-mile  final  race  with  a  time  of 10  minutes,  34  seconds.  My  model  was  designed to  the  minimum  dimension  requirements  of  the rules,  constructed  very  light,  and  powered  by  a Torpedo  “ 29” .  Its  light  weight  of just  17  ounces gave  it  terrific  acceleration,  with  a  top  speed  of about  85  m.p.h.  That  year  there  were  only  18 entrants,  but  each  year  since  has  seen  increased entries. The best  time  I’ve seen here in  the U.S.A. in  a  ten  mile  race  was  at  the  1954  Nationals  in Chicago.  George  Moir,  using  a  specially  hopped Fox  “ 29” ,  took  first  place  that  year  with  the  very good time of just under 8 minutes, which is fast  in competition  flying.  Better  times  have  been  flown, although  I’ve never seen them, and  I  have heard of ten  mile  races  being  covered  in  slightly  over  7 minutes.Hob  l.alker  and  thr  "MIGHATOH'·.  Hr  hot  named  thin  tertianuf the drtign “ Little  11 illir", after  hit  irifrThis year’s 1956 Nationals, held at Dallas, Texas, on  July  23rd-29th  showed  a  strong  interest  in Team  Racing with a total  of 56 entrants.  However, only  30  planes made  qualifying flights.  The job  of directing this year’s event was given  to me.  We had a very close  race throughout,  with some of the  top Team Racing flyers entered.  First place was won by Kenneth  Moras  of  Galesburg,  Illinois,  flying a Torpedo “ 29“ with a finishing time of 10 minutes, 29  seconds.  The  finish  was  close,  with  Richard Heist,  Jnr.,  of Fort  Worth,  Texas,  coming  in  next just  two seconds behind  Moras. The  times  weren’t especially  fast,  but  the  competition  was  very  close with evenly matched airplanes, which always makes for a good  race.Team  Racing  is  ever  growing  in  popularity throughout the world.  While in Europe  I witnessed some of the finest Team Racing  I’ve ever seen. The competition  at  the  1954  World  Speed  Champion­ships  at  The  Hague,  I lolland,  was  unsurpassed anywhere,  as  was  flying  at  the  Vlth  Criterium  of Europe in Brussels in  1955.  Much to my disappoint­ment, there was  no Team Racing event at  the  1955 World Speed Championships at Paris. A regrettable and  most  unfortunate  oversight  for  so  important a competition.F.A.I.  rules  requiring  2-5  c.c.  engines  were pre­dominantly  used  in  Europe.  I  personally  like  this class very much and would like to see it become more popular here in the U.S.A. Judging by the perform­ance  of Team  Racers  in  the  F.A.I.  2-5  c.c.  class, I  am  inclined to believe that  we here in  the  U.S.A. would have a hard race on our hands in competition with  Europe’s  best,  and  in  fact  would  likely  have difficulty  in  even  keeping  up.  I  have  yet  to  see finer  flying than  seen  in  Europe.An  event  such  as  Team  Racing  requires  some­thing  more  than  the  average  model  airplane event. It  takes a high degree  of team  work  and  perfection to  consistently  turn  in  winning performance.  The pilot must be highly skilled  in  control-line  flying to



December.  1956663avoid the many dangers that arise when  flying four or five planes in the same circle. The airplane itself must be  rugged, dependable and a stable flyer.  But even more important is the job of the ground crew man.  Here  is where  the  race  is cither won  or  lost. The  entire  outcome  of the  race  depends  upon  his ability to re-start the  engine as  quickly its possible.Primarily Team Racing is the same in  Europe as in the U.S.A., in that the final race is either a 10-milc or  10-kilometrc  course.  The  requirements  of  the aircraft  are  about  the  same,  necessitating  similar dimensions  and  fuel  limitations.  There  does, however,  seem  to  be  a  vast  difference  in  the elimination  races prior to the finals.  In  Europe it is common  to  have  5-mile or  5-kilometre  elimination races  to  determine  who  is  to  fly  in  the  final  race. I Ierc  in  the  U.S.A.  things  are  a  bit  more  com­plicated.  We  run  a  series  of  much shorter sprints, known as heat races, leading up to the 10-mile final  race.Present  rules  call  for  even  further eliminations.  Every  airplane  makes a qualifying flight and is timed from the instant of release  on take-off for a  course  of  seven  laps.  The  20 fastest  qualifying  airplanes  are  then selected  to  enter  the  race,  thus eliminating  all  slower  aircraft  from the  start.  Flying  four  planes  per race,  each  of  the 20  qualifying models is allowed to fly once in each of a  21-lap,  35-lap,  and  70-lap heat race.  Each  plane  is  given  points  on a  graduated  point  system  for  the place  it  finishes  in  each  heat  race.The  four  high  point  airplanes  go into  the  final  race.  In  addition, a  100-lap  Consolation  Race  is  run between  the  5th  through  9th  place models, and  the winner of this race also enters the final  race. These five planes  fly  in  the  10-mile,  140-lap final  race,  and  the  winners  are determined  by  their  position  at  the finish.The  basic  reason  for  the  short sprint  races  is to save time, for here in  the  U.S.A.  there  are  normally such  large  numbers  of  entries  at contests  that  time  is  at  a  premium.A  further intent of the short races is to require that Team  Racing models be  capable of winning speed  dashes as  well  as  the  long  races.  This  is a much more complicated procedure than   the   simplified   elimination system  used  in  Europe.I'he "MU'.K ( TOR", a  Traiii  Harrr ile»ign  byRob  Luther,  powered  by  a  Torpedo  "29'''.Ron  lint  place  in  Team  Racing  at  the  V.S.1051 National· with  the original prototype  o fI hit  model.  ThU  ie  hie  thiril  vereion  o f  the"M IGRATOR".  U right U 17 ounce·. Propellerie 8 inrhe»  by  9 inrhr·  Tornado  "Plaaticoat".Terrific  acceleration  with  a  lop  a peril  ofModels  here  are generally  flown  with  engines of ‘190 to  *300  cubic  inches  (3-25  to  5  c.c.)  displace­ment,  as  outlined  in  A.M.A.  regulations.  A  one- ounce  fuel  system  is  allowed.  As  an  added  safety factor,  and  to save  valuable  time  at  large  contests, a  fuel  shut-off is  required.  Fuel  shut-offs  can  be most  difficult  to  install  in  a  model,  and  could possibly be a  limiting factor in  the growth of Team Racing.  Many  modellers  here  feel  that  elimination of  the  shut-off  from  the  rules  might  further  the popularity of this  event.  Our  models  are  flown  on the  standard  60-foot,  -0 1 2-inch  diameter  control lines,  making it possible for a model to handle very nicely at our average speed range of 70 to 100 m.p.h.If Team  Racing continues to  grow  in  interest as it  has  in  the  past,  it  is  destined  to  become  one  of model  aviation’s  most  popular  control-line  events

." MIGRATOR " plan & a phew fotos there .
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 12:00:03 AM by Air Ministry . »


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