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Author Topic: Complicated Engine  (Read 1683 times)

Offline Robert Zambelli

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Complicated Engine
« on: July 26, 2019, 01:28:35 PM »
Since we have an occasional post about cars, hear's a question for the enthusiasts/mechanics:

What's the most complicated automobile you've ever worked on?

Bob Z.

Offline Jim Mynes

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2019, 02:00:51 PM »
M-1 Abrams Main Battle Tank
I have seen the light, and it’s powered by a lipo.

Offline Tim Wescott

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #2 on: July 26, 2019, 02:09:45 PM »
Any of my current 'puterized suburban sedans.

I generally open the hood, look around, say "screw it" and take them to a mechanic.  I'll work on my 69 C-10 and my 63 Suburban, though.
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Offline SteveMoon

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2019, 03:01:20 PM »
Any Audi. Hate working on Audis.

Steve

Online Brett Buck

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #4 on: July 26, 2019, 04:09:07 PM »
Since we have an occasional post about cars, hear's a question for the enthusiasts/mechanics:

What's the most complicated automobile you've ever worked on?

Bob Z.

    Mid-late 80's Honda Prelude, dual carbs with CA emissions.

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Offline Jim Kraft

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #5 on: July 26, 2019, 04:43:31 PM »
I have not had a car that was easy to work on since my 48 Ford Flat Head.
Jim Kraft

Offline Tony Drago

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #6 on: July 26, 2019, 05:17:38 PM »
Any car that you can not see the spark plugs.

Online Steve_Pollock

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #7 on: July 26, 2019, 05:39:05 PM »
The Citroen-Maserati V-6.  It was basically a V-twin, then the cam chain journal, then a V-4.  Replacing the cam chain basically required disassembling the engine, and if the cam chain sprockets were off by one notch, you had to take it apart and do it again.  It was used in the Citroen-Maserati car (not officially imported into the US) and the Maserati Merak, which was a competitor with the Dino (Ferrari) in the '70s.

Offline Gary Dowler

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #8 on: July 26, 2019, 09:30:49 PM »
I can tell you what one of the worst was.  My sister in law had a 1988 dodge caravan, with the 3.0l v-6. They came with a 3.0 and a 3.3. These engines were vastly different. On our 3.3 I changed the water pump in 45 minutes. Then came the day I was asked to change the water pump on her 3.0L. Oh my! 
You pull the right front wheel off, remove the fender skirt. Pull off every accessory on the motor. Then pull the TIMING BELT!  Then the pulley on the crank shaft.  Now you have reached the water pump! 
It's bolted to the block, with the crankshaft directly turning it.  This water pump is bolted in place with 13 bolts!  It took me 4.5hrs to simply remove it! Nearly as long to install and replace everything.  Worst design of a water pump I have ever seen.

Gary
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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #9 on: July 27, 2019, 04:52:13 AM »
Hello The worst car I've worked was my 1974 Jaguar V12 that was the last of the 4 carbed ones . More breakdowns then anything else I've owned , finally sold it at great $ loss with a blown engine , that was 30years ago. Another difficult to work on car was a Toyota Supra but a very nice car and fun to drive at least.
Easiest and least complicated would be my brothers 1947 Morris Oxford Flat Head 4 and my old Chevy C10 a pleasure to work on , so simple and plenty of space.
Regards Gerald

Offline Dan McEntee

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #10 on: July 27, 2019, 08:08:43 AM »
  I've worked on all sorts of car and motorcycle engines, and model engines. Nothing is too bad as long as you have some sort of documentation to guide you. I've rebuilt rear ends and transmissions successfully, again, all you need to know are specifications for clearances and such. For a living, I used to rebuild torque converters for automatic transmissions. Some of them were as simple as  only having three components, while others were a real collection of small parts! Some of those would come in like a hand grenade went off in them, and you would have to rebuild and repair the parts before you could rebuild the converter!
  The most complicated thing I have ever worked on was when assembling and installing printing presses, web or sheet fed presses. The machine I was trained on was over 150 feet long, 8 print units, double web with two roll stands and infeeds, double stacked two zone gas fired dryers, , sheeter, and two styles of combination folders. I started with installing and wiring what were called "Tec Turns" that directed the paper web out of the first four units then up and over the last four units into the upper dryer. This provided a device that let the paper with we ink float on a cushion of air while it made two 90 degree turns, and also centered the paper in the middle of the dryer. This one component of the press too over 5 miles of wire to provide operating power and control circuits.. The press was assembled from one 5 unit single web press and compatible parts to make it an 8 unit, double web press. All the drive line components, similar to automotive drive shafts with large gearboxes to allow changes in elevations and direction, were rebuilt. All of this was driven by a two, 200 horsepower DC motors. The placement of the units on the pad have to be within .001" of each other, and the units weighed about 23,000 pounds each. From the first to last roller of the entire length of the press, there was no more than .004" variance. The alignment of the entire press starts with a scribed line on the floor the length of the pad with a perpendicular line scribed for the face of the fifth unit. The fifth unit is set first, then the others are set and measured off that unit. Then a length of .010" music wire is stretched like a guitar string the entire length of the press. The alignment of the entire press is set off that wire, and anyone that breaks it has to buy dinner for everyone else! I lost track of how much wire we pulled for the operating power and related controls. But is was great fun and very satisfying when we could finally see crystal clear print and images coming off of it at over 40,000 impressions an hour. Not as complicated as a moon rocket or the Space Shuttle but when most people see one run for the first time up close, it is pretty awe inspiring.  It's a lot like a Big Boy steam locomotive that stands still!
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Offline Andre Ming

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #11 on: July 27, 2019, 09:37:24 AM »
My sister in law had a 1988 dodge caravan... Worst design of a water pump I have ever seen.

Gary

The little mechanical exposure I've had to Chrysler products convinced me they are designed by a committee of idiots.

Agree: Some of the worst mechanical designs ever. (Like having to jack up, remove the front wheel, and part of the inner fender in order to change a battery!! Idiocy.)

Andre
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Offline FLOYD CARTER

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #12 on: July 27, 2019, 09:51:55 AM »
When I had my '55 Chevy Bel Air, V-8, it was a major project to change/clean spark plugs.  Required getting under the car and snaking past the exhaust manifold with special wrenches.  Nowadays, spark plugs last forever.  My 2002 Toyota Sienna has 180K miles with original plugs, and I have never touched them!  Toyotas seem to never break.
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Offline Robert Zambelli

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #13 on: July 27, 2019, 10:22:15 AM »
WOW!!!
Thanks for some interesting responses.
I can agree with these comments, having been in the auto business myself.

I had a specialty shop in Rochester NY back in the 80s, specializing in exotic imports.
Believe me, I ran into some real beauts.
Although I specialized in Italian cars (Ferrari, Maserati (only the in-line sixes), FIAT and ALFA), I did run into a few others.
The absolute WORST was Lamborghini - an absolute nightmare to say the least. The early Countach required draining the coolant and removing the main coolant pipes the change the air filters! The Jalpa required removing the engine to change the four (front) spark plugs.
After those two experiences, I categorically refused to service any Lamborghini autos.
I could go on and on but I'd like to hear from you.

Anyone want to see the most complicated engine I've ever worked on?   #^  #^

Bob Z.



Offline Dan McEntee

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #14 on: July 27, 2019, 10:56:42 AM »
  One differentiation that has to be made is, what is complicated and what is just poorly planned, engineered and executed!!
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Online Brett Buck

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #15 on: July 27, 2019, 11:22:10 AM »
  One differentiation that has to be made is, what is complicated and what is just poorly planned, engineered and executed!!

   Exactly, the examples are more in the "dumb" genre than "complicated". I have more than a few of those, mostly from Lotus. For instance, don't make a mid-engine car with no ventilation to the engine compartment. And then, don't put a styrene plastic fuel fitting in there and expect it to last for more than about 6 months. Also, don't put the ignition coil immediately underneath said plastic fuel tee. I can go on indefinitely with these (like don't put the (non-leak-proof) battery on top of the passenger-side fuel tank, bolted to UK-quality 1/2" plywood and a patch of UK-quality velcro to hold it).  For that matter, don't make the "firewall" out of 1 1/4" plywood, or the "roll bar" a 1/2" thick fiberglass protrusion.

   Brett

Offline dave siegler

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #16 on: July 27, 2019, 01:08:57 PM »
honda motor cycles CBX was not to my liking

but has a kid I helped a guy with a ford 427 Cammer.  that was complicated

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Offline Bill Adair

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #17 on: July 27, 2019, 07:23:11 PM »
I've always said that the manufacturers should require all of their design engineers to work in the associated service departments, for at least one day per month!

My niece drove a Volkswagen SUV with a ghost electrical problem for years, and the companies best techs could never solve the problem! She finally sold the damn thing after the dealer refused to look at it again without charging for the service!

They are very lucky it wasn't my vehicle!
Not a flyer (age related), but still love the hobby!

Offline Gary Dowler

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #18 on: July 28, 2019, 01:22:23 AM »
Easiest engine I've ever played with was probably my first car, a 1973 Vega GT.  140ci  inline 4.  Next best is my older (04) subaru 2.5. 

Our newer Subaru, the 2016, has the oil filter right on top and out front. Even has perfectly engineered access to the drain plug. If it were a domestic design with these features, I'm certain someone would have been sacked.

Gary
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Offline Gary Dowler

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #19 on: July 28, 2019, 01:25:24 AM »
I did an engine swap once in a 1992 Ford Aerostar minivan. 4x4 model with 4.0L v6. That one was entertaining......

Gary
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Offline John Watson

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #20 on: July 28, 2019, 09:09:02 AM »
I took my wifes Kia Sedona Van to have a tune up and they said it would be three hundred dollars to change plugs. You have to completely remove most of the engine to get to the three plugs in the back of the engine...…..went and traded it in on a new one...……..


Offline John Rist

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #21 on: July 28, 2019, 10:08:58 AM »
Never worked on one but I would vote for the Pratt & Whitney R-4360-20. 

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Offline Dan McEntee

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Re: Complicated Engine/4360
« Reply #22 on: July 28, 2019, 04:22:02 PM »
   There isn't anything too complicated about a 4360, it's just four, 7 cylinder radials connected together!  Simplicity is usually associated with durability and radials are known for their durability and reliability, While attending an air race/air show in Olathe, Kansas many years ago with Chris McMillin, we hung around the pits on Saturday afternoon while teams tinkered on their airplanes preparing for the next day. i sat in the Planes of Fame pit talking to the guys while they did a post flight check on the 4360 in the nose of their Super Corsair. That mainly consisted of taking a single open end wrench ( a BIG one!) and torquing the bolts that attached the intake and exhaust manifolds to the cylinders. When that was finished, they pulled the plugs from a rear cylinder towards the back, about the 8 o'clock position, and examined it, and it was a nice, biscuit brown. They put those back, and then plugged in a dip stick crank case heater, and then headed to the hotel for the party!. The Mustang guys were checking and resetting valves, pulling cylinders, and all getting ready to burn the midnight oil. Chris and I followed the Chino crew not long after that, as it started to get kind of cold!!!
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Offline YakNine

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #23 on: July 29, 2019, 09:24:28 AM »
My Ex Wife had an 86 Pontiac Trans Am with a feed back Quadra Jet 4 Barrel with a solenoid controlled mixture assembly we could never get that carb set right it would change calibration values just sitting still. But the plugs were a nightmare until I pulled the front wheels and took a hole saw to the wheel wells and added some access holes, but I did put snap in rubber plugs in them. It was a blast to drive but a nightmare to work on, my Ex actually thought I was going to fight her for it in the divorce, I told her give me an address to deliver it I don't want it! TJ
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Offline Tony Drago

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #24 on: July 29, 2019, 10:37:01 AM »
My Ex Wife had an 86 Pontiac Trans Am with a feed back Quadra Jet 4 Barrel with a solenoid controlled mixture assembly we could never get that carb set right it would change calibration values just sitting still. But the plugs were a nightmare until I pulled the front wheels and took a hole saw to the wheel wells and added some access holes, but I did put snap in rubber plugs in them. It was a blast to drive but a nightmare to work on, my Ex actually thought I was going to fight her for it in the divorce, I told her give me an address to deliver it I don't want it! TJ

On the spark plugs. It was know that was also done on the early big block Mustangs. They were a royal pain to change,no matter what kind of special tools were available.

Offline Fredvon4

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #25 on: July 29, 2019, 12:04:20 PM »
Dad back from 'Nam bought a 1970 Ford LTD Station wagon with big V 8...427/ 428 CJ... don't remember

Rear plugs required fender removal....grrrr....Dad was a strict DYI auto maintenance guy....first and last Ford.... and only vehicle I ever remember him paying for dealer service

Let me ...)well no, I am too tired(.....tell you all about M561 Gamma Goat Maintenance ...absolute nightmare to do ANY THING on....https://www.google.com/search?q=gama+goat&oq=Gamma+Goat&aqs=chrome.1.69i57j0l5.5349j0j1&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8
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Offline Steve Helmick

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #26 on: July 29, 2019, 01:20:21 PM »
Fairbanks-Morse diesel locomotive engine. It was in a tugboat. The engine was an inline 6 or 8 or 16 or somethin', but had multiple cylinder heads. I can't recall right now if the head(s?) we removed were for one cylinder or two, but we pulled it/them off and sent it/them out for refurb. What I remember most was that each head was about half a ton, and the head studs/nuts/bolts/whatever had to be torqued to 1,600 ft. lbs.

Two of us were working on it, I was about 170 lbs nekkid and the other guy was over 200. Both of us were in our late 20's or early 30's. We had a 1" sq. drive torque wrench, a 4:1 multiplier and the appropriate socket...probably about 2" or maybe bigger. We got everything snugged up and started trying to get to the 400 lbs (1,600/4) on the torque wrench, and failed. We got an aluminum pipe "cheater" (about 5' long) and slipped it on the torque wrench handle. Still no joy. We got a "come-along" and hooked that sucker to the railing around the engine and finally got 'er done! Diamond plate floor boards are slippery danged things. I'm guessing that the cylinder bores were 12" or more. Not really complicated, but not so easy to work on, either.  D>K Steve
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Offline Andre Ming

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #27 on: July 29, 2019, 10:08:40 PM »
Steve:

What RR did you work for when you worked on FM's? Frisco over at Tulsa? They used FM switch engines.

Andre
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Offline dave siegler

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #28 on: July 30, 2019, 04:49:16 PM »
I took my wifes Kia Sedona Van to have a tune up and they said it would be three hundred dollars to change plugs. You have to completely remove most of the engine to get to the three plugs in the back of the engine...…..went and traded it in on a new one...……..

I did that on 2 of them.  Ouch have to take off the entire intake system to get it done.  The
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Offline Steve Helmick

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #29 on: July 31, 2019, 08:25:09 PM »
Steve:

What RR did you work for when you worked on FM's? Frisco over at Tulsa? They used FM switch engines.

Andre

The F-M was in a tugboat, as stated in my post! My GF (on Mom's side) started as an oiler, not sure what year, maybe late '20's, then worked his way up to fireman and engineer on choo-choo's for the Pacific Western & Santa Fe (IIRC) out of Albany, Oregon, until he retired in about '55-'57. He said he liked steam engines better than diesel-electrics. Mostly hauled logs, from what I remember seeing.  y1 Steve   
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 In 2015 18-20 year old's need safe zones so people don't hurt their feelings.  "Be polite, be professional, but have a plan to kill everybody you meet." General Mattis.

Offline Robert Zambelli

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Re: Complicated Engine/4360
« Reply #30 on: August 13, 2019, 10:43:17 AM »
   There isn't anything too complicated about a 4360, it's just four, 7 cylinder radials connected together!  Simplicity is usually associated with durability and radials are known for their durability and reliability, While attending an air race/air show in Olathe, Kansas many years ago with Chris McMillin, we hung around the pits on Saturday afternoon while teams tinkered on their airplanes preparing for the next day. i sat in the Planes of Fame pit talking to the guys while they did a post flight check on the 4360 in the nose of their Super Corsair. That mainly consisted of taking a single open end wrench ( a BIG one!) and torquing the bolts that attached the intake and exhaust manifolds to the cylinders. When that was finished, they pulled the plugs from a rear cylinder towards the back, about the 8 o'clock position, and examined it, and it was a nice, biscuit brown. They put those back, and then plugged in a dip stick crank case heater, and then headed to the hotel for the party!. The Mustang guys were checking and resetting valves, pulling cylinders, and all getting ready to burn the midnight oil. Chris and I followed the Chino crew not long after that, as it started to get kind of cold!!!
    Type at you later,
  Dan McEntee

Not complicated? I tend to disagree!
I snapped these photos last week at the museum in Sevierville, TN.
It's the most complicated aircraft engine I've eve seen - and I've seen many.

Bob Z.


Offline Dave_Trible

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #31 on: August 13, 2019, 10:54:10 AM »
86’ Honda Accord I bought out of a junkyard and rebuilt.  To change the headlights you went into the taillights and worked forward.

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Offline Robert Zambelli

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #32 on: August 13, 2019, 12:29:18 PM »
Great assortment of interesting comments - BUT, looking at my opening comment you'll see that I stated specifically CAR engines.

I know nothing about Diesels or radials other than the fact that they're not car engines (with a few Diesel exceptions) and furthermore I was curious about the complexity of the car engine itself, not the accessibility and/or serviceability.

OK, now my story.

The most complicate engine I’ve ever worked on was a Ferrari type 141 engine, serial number 0646. The engine was a marvel of engineering and reliability and quite complicated.

V-12, aluminum block and heads, steel liners, 4 cams, two plugs per cylinder, two distributors, each having four sets of points, six twin-throat down draft Webers, dry sump and no flywheel.

245.5 cubic inches, 447 HP @ 8,500 RPM (we had the dyno sheets).

It was originally fitted to a Ferrari 4100 Sport (I cannot recall the serial number) in 1956 and set up for road races, including the Mille Miglia.

Driven by Alfonso Antonio Vicente Eduardo Angel Blas Francisco de Borja Cabeza de Vaca y Leighton, 11th Marquess di Portago, AKA Alfonso de Portago, he had a horrific crash, killing himself, his co-driver and 10 spectators. The cause was a tire failure at 150 MPH. This ended the Mille Miglia.

The engine was then used in a single seat roadster for the Monza-Indianapolis “Race of Two Worlds” in July of 1958.

After the race, Ferrari commissioned a new Testa Rossa style body and installed the engine, coupled to a Lancia D-50 transaxle. Serial number 0744, it was nicknamed the 412 MI and sent to the USA to be raced by people like Phil Hill.
 
My friend acquired it in 1978, ran it in FCA club events and occasionally on the street. He let me drive it at Watkins Glen and it’s the only car that ever truly scared me. Applying full throttle at 120 MPH would spin the tires.

The photos show the engine of this remarkable car. The oil filler was moved to the right side for direct access to the oil tank. Originally, it was on the left side, going directly into the crankcase (sump). If the engine was revved before the scavenging pumps could empty the sump, the front crank seal would blow out.

That’s my story, comments welcome!

« Last Edit: August 13, 2019, 02:29:37 PM by Robert Zambelli »

Offline Bill Adair

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #33 on: August 13, 2019, 12:46:07 PM »
What a beautiful engine, and car!

Must be full time job, for several people to maintain?

Bill
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Offline Motorman

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #34 on: August 13, 2019, 12:53:06 PM »
Does a General Electric CJ610-6 count?


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Offline Ian MacNeil

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #35 on: August 13, 2019, 02:11:57 PM »

Does a General Electric CJ610-6 count?
Only if it's been installed in a car.

If you search the net for radial and jet powered
VW beetles you will find some interesting stuff.

Offline Gary Dowler

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #36 on: August 14, 2019, 12:15:08 AM »
Great story, Robert.  Good pics of a beautiful machine as well.

You mentioned wheel spin at 120.  That can get exciting VERY fast.   My fav car of all time is the 2005/2006 Ford GT.  Hennessey did a kit for this to substantially up the HP to 1000 RWHP.  In the attached video, the driver of this one sets the boost to its low setting of 14.5lbs (783 RWHP) and runs it 0-225mph.  Watch the shift from 3rd to 4th, at 142mph.  There is momentary wheel slip...at 142!  Amazing.  Set it at 19psi, and .......   I know one of these Hennessey cars was run in Texas (street legal car) and recorded a 2 way average of 237mph, and was determined to not have been running optimally.



Gary
Profanity is the crutch of the illiterate mind

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #37 on: August 14, 2019, 06:24:06 AM »
It should be noted that Bob is not only an enthusiast, but an engineer as well.
If he says something is complicated, I believe him!


Offline Jim Carter

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #38 on: August 15, 2019, 03:10:03 PM »
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%^@ LL~ LL~  He said "car" !!  Not the "Ultimate Joy Ride" vehicle!! LL~ LL~

Offline Tim Wescott

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #39 on: August 15, 2019, 03:28:29 PM »
...BUT, looking at my opening comment you'll see that I stated specifically CAR engines...


Oh, that's why no one mentioned turbo-compound engines.  A former coworker of mine was a tech of some sort in the air force, and got to see the innards of some of those.
AMA 64232

The problem with electric is that once you get the smoke generator and sound system installed, the plane is too heavy.

Offline Chris McMillin

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #40 on: August 15, 2019, 06:33:28 PM »
Hello The worst car I've worked was my 1974 Jaguar V12 that was the last of the 4 carbed ones . More breakdowns then anything else I've owned , finally sold it at great $ loss with a blown engine , that was 30years ago. Another difficult to work on car was a Toyota Supra but a very nice car and fun to drive at least.
Easiest and least complicated would be my brothers 1947 Morris Oxford Flat Head 4 and my old Chevy C10 a pleasure to work on , so simple and plenty of space.
Regards Gerald

Here is one of those, easiest to maintain V-12 ever. Has no adjustable parts, hydraulic lifters, electronic ignition. The idle speed is all you can adjust on the carbs. This one has 18,000 miles and I drive it at least three or four times a year. It has had the water pump changed and the carb diaphragms replaced. Original plugs. What a smooth, powerful engine.
Chris...

Offline Chris McMillin

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Re: Complicated Engine/4360
« Reply #41 on: August 15, 2019, 06:47:29 PM »
On run-up there is division AND a K factor to determine mag drop! It has been too long I cannot remember how to it worked out. It has four mags and two generators, I recall.
Chris...

Not complicated? I tend to disagree!
I snapped these photos last week at the museum in Sevierville, TN.
It's the most complicated aircraft engine I've eve seen - and I've seen many.

Bob Z.

Offline Chris McMillin

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #42 on: August 15, 2019, 06:55:55 PM »
My favorite front engine Ferrari body, I did not know the history of that engine and the fact it was a Monzanapolis engine makes it a double favorite!
Very cool and thanks for the pics too.

Chris...


Great assortment of interesting comments - BUT, looking at my opening comment you'll see that I stated specifically CAR engines.

I know nothing about Diesels or radials other than the fact that they're not car engines (with a few Diesel exceptions) and furthermore I was curious about the complexity of the car engine itself, not the accessibility and/or serviceability.

OK, now my story.

The most complicate engine I’ve ever worked on was a Ferrari type 141 engine, serial number 0646. The engine was a marvel of engineering and reliability and quite complicated.

V-12, aluminum block and heads, steel liners, 4 cams, two plugs per cylinder, two distributors, each having four sets of points, six twin-throat down draft Webers, dry sump and no flywheel.

245.5 cubic inches, 447 HP @ 8,500 RPM (we had the dyno sheets).

It was originally fitted to a Ferrari 4100 Sport (I cannot recall the serial number) in 1956 and set up for road races, including the Mille Miglia.

Driven by Alfonso Antonio Vicente Eduardo Angel Blas Francisco de Borja Cabeza de Vaca y Leighton, 11th Marquess di Portago, AKA Alfonso de Portago, he had a horrific crash, killing himself, his co-driver and 10 spectators. The cause was a tire failure at 150 MPH. This ended the Mille Miglia.

The engine was then used in a single seat roadster for the Monza-Indianapolis “Race of Two Worlds” in July of 1958.

After the race, Ferrari commissioned a new Testa Rossa style body and installed the engine, coupled to a Lancia D-50 transaxle. Serial number 0744, it was nicknamed the 412 MI and sent to the USA to be raced by people like Phil Hill.
 
My friend acquired it in 1978, ran it in FCA club events and occasionally on the street. He let me drive it at Watkins Glen and it’s the only car that ever truly scared me. Applying full throttle at 120 MPH would spin the tires.

The photos show the engine of this remarkable car. The oil filler was moved to the right side for direct access to the oil tank. Originally, it was on the left side, going directly into the crankcase (sump). If the engine was revved before the scavenging pumps could empty the sump, the front crank seal would blow out.

That’s my story, comments welcome!

Offline Chris McMillin

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Re: Complicated Engine
« Reply #43 on: August 15, 2019, 07:00:56 PM »
Wow! I'm always amazed at the boost levels these car engines achieve. 14.5 lbs of boost is two atmospheres, 61 inches of manifold pressure, the same as P-51 on take off, the same as an Indy Car on qualifying day. You say that was low boost!

Chris...

Great story, Robert.  Good pics of a beautiful machine as well.

You mentioned wheel spin at 120.  That can get exciting VERY fast.   My fav car of all time is the 2005/2006 Ford GT.  Hennessey did a kit for this to substantially up the HP to 1000 RWHP.  In the attached video, the driver of this one sets the boost to its low setting of 14.5lbs (783 RWHP) and runs it 0-225mph.  Watch the shift from 3rd to 4th, at 142mph.  There is momentary wheel slip...at 142!  Amazing.  Set it at 19psi, and .......   I know one of these Hennessey cars was run in Texas (street legal car) and recorded a 2 way average of 237mph, and was determined to not have been running optimally.



Gary


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