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  • June 21, 2021, 01:20:41 PM

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Author Topic: #2: Cleaning an engine for storage after using it.  (Read 667 times)

Offline Air Master

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#2: Cleaning an engine for storage after using it.
« on: May 25, 2021, 06:11:52 PM »
Hello Gentleman. 

I was wondering how you guys clean an engine for storage after using it, so it does not lock up from castor oil gum.

I think that, in the very least, the back plate should come off so you can spray the inside with carburator cleaner, in addition to spraying inside  the cylinder (above the piston).  Then you could spray some fogging oil or air tool oil in both places.

What do you guys do to keep your engines from locking up in storage?


Offline Motorman

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Re: #2: Cleaning an engine for storage after using it.
« Reply #1 on: May 25, 2021, 06:41:26 PM »
Run the engine until it's hot. While it's still running put the glow plug clip on and pull off the fuel line. Once it quits choke the venturi, keep it choked and prop it over to run out the last bit of fuel. With the fuel line still removed, take a mixture of cigarette lighter fluid (naptha) with a little Transmission fluid mixed in and heavily prime the venturi and fire up the engine so it runs off the prime. Do this twice, not three times. This will flush out the castor and nitro and leave preservative oil everywhere fuel usually goes.

Motorman 8)
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Offline Air Master

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Re: #2: Cleaning an engine for storage after using it.
« Reply #2 on: May 25, 2021, 07:55:23 PM »
Thanks.  I never heard of that.   Do you put air tool oil after that? 

Offline Air Ministry .

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Re: #2: Cleaning an engine for storage after using it.
« Reply #3 on: May 25, 2021, 10:55:14 PM »
Flush it with alcohol , to disperse nitro residue .Maybe a few times generously .
Plug out to belt over to clear the alcohol . Leave it in the sun .

Oil it well . MINERAL OIL is said to beat syntehetic any day. For STORAGE .

But someones just got a litre of chainsaw bar oil . Which is sticky & recomeded for machined motorcycle componetry etc .

Whaddeva ya do , KEEP IT AWAY FROM THE DAMP  .

Offline Motorman

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Re: #2: Cleaning an engine for storage after using it.
« Reply #4 on: May 26, 2021, 09:32:05 AM »
Thanks.  I never heard of that.   Do you put air tool oil after that?

No, you don't want to mix oils as a general rule. You can use air tool oil in the naptha if you think it's better.

If you have an engine with an iron piston or ring and no muffler you should close the exhaust port and put a drop of oil on the piston then prop it over a few times after the above procedure. This will put a little extra oil in an exposed area.

If you put the engine in a zip loc baggie and crush the air out of the bag then zip loc it will stay good for several years.
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Online Peter in Fairfax, VA

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Re: #2: Cleaning an engine for storage after using it.
« Reply #5 on: May 28, 2021, 10:37:19 AM »
Myself, here's what I'd advise:

1.  With a prop, plug and backplate installed, put half a dozen drops of Air Tool oil or ATF into the intake.
2.  Flip it over a dozen times.
3.  Remove the prop.
4.  Possibly brush a little of the oil/atf onto fasteners (screws, prop nut/shaft)
5.  Wrap the engine in a paper towel.  Absorbs some moisture and blocks some UV.
6.  Zip loc bag, possibly evacuated of air, as convenient.

If it's mounted on a plane, oil it, then wrap it with a rag.

Offline Daniel_Munro

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Re: #2: Cleaning an engine for storage after using it.
« Reply #6 on: May 30, 2021, 03:27:17 PM »
A few drops ATF down the venturi and flip it through several times does the trick.
NZL7396

Offline Chris Wilson

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Re: #2: Cleaning an engine for storage after using it.
« Reply #7 on: May 31, 2021, 02:39:50 AM »
I agree with most of the above but wish to add, leave  the exhaust port open if possible so that any unburnt hydrocarbons can gas off.
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Offline Air Master

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Re: #2: Cleaning an engine for storage after using it.
« Reply #8 on: June 04, 2021, 09:47:56 AM »
Thank you everyone for the info. 

Offline Air Ministry .

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Re: #2: Cleaning an engine for storage after using it.
« Reply #9 on: June 09, 2021, 06:47:53 PM »
Purloined from :   https://combatflyers.co.uk/howto-rothwell1.htm                             via Baton Forum .

"  It occurred to me that some of the R320 users may not be used to storing ball raced engines.

As your competition season has now ended there may be a few R320's which won't be run for a month or more and if they aren't lubricated properly now, then they will need new bearings next season, and if a bearing fails in use it can do much worse damage to the rest of the engine.

Castor oil is a fantastic lubricant but after running it dries out and eventually gets to the point where the balls in the bearings don't roll but skid.  It is very difficult to wash out once it has gotten to this stage.

For long storage ( more than a few weeks ) I recommend that the engine is removed from the model, spray inside and out with WD40 or similar, then lubricate with after run oil.

There are many good oils for this purpose, I use and recommend automotive automatic transmission fluid.  Some down the venturi, in the exhaust and around the prop driver, put in a few drops and flip it over, a few more and flip it over, don't over do it and you do and it locks as you try to turn it over simply allow the excess to drain out the exhaust.

Wrap the engine in a rag and as long as you are sure there is no moisture present you can also pop it in a plastic bag and store it in a dry place.

After every days flying they should get a spray with wd and then lubricated with the after run, it would most likely be fine for a week but often a week turns into 2 then 3 and so on, and before you know it there is a problem which could so easily have been avoided.

If the engine is expected to be stored for only a few weeks then by all means leave it in the model but give it the oil.

Before starting for the first time flush it through with some fuel to wash the oil out.

With this treatment I have engines which have been used for years with out a bearing change, and on the other hand seen too many with only a couiple of hours running ruined through neglect.

Steve Rothwell "

=======================================================================================================================

Apparently MINERAL OIL , rather than Syntetic , is the go . Tho Syntetic ATF along with 1/3 power steering fluid , is better in power steering . Unless its electric .  ??? S?P

Offline Brett Buck

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Re: #2: Cleaning an engine for storage after using it.
« Reply #10 on: June 10, 2021, 01:51:22 PM »

I think that, in the very least, the back plate should come off so you can spray the inside with carburator cleaner, in addition to spraying inside  the cylinder (above the piston).  Then you could spray some fogging oil or air tool oil in both places.

What do you guys do to keep your engines from locking up in storage?

   You should never take an engine apart unless there is something wrong with it.

    I have had satisfactory results using air tool oil, dribbled in right after the last run, and then occasionally (every few years) taking them out and turning them over. I have yet to find anything that will not eventually gum up, however, heat usually fixes that. Of course, you could take everything apart, clean it, then reassemble it (with light machine oil like Singer Sewing Machine Oil), but again, you should never take an engine apart unless there is something wrong with it.

     Brett

Online Paul Smith

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Re: #2: Cleaning an engine for storage after using it.
« Reply #11 on: June 10, 2021, 08:38:03 PM »
As recommended by George Aldrich, I use Rislone Oil Treatment.

I've started engines after thirty years with no problem.

Don't believe me?  Rislone an engine and try it in 2051.
Paul Smith

Online Dan McEntee

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Re: #2: Cleaning an engine for storage after using it.
« Reply #12 on: June 10, 2021, 10:10:21 PM »
As recommended by George Aldrich, I use Rislone Oil Treatment.

I've started engines after thirty years with no problem.

Don't believe me?  Rislone an engine and try it in 2051.

   I have to remember to check at the auto parts store to see if it's still made. I have come up with a couple of cans of the stuff and knew that was what George recommended for prelube at assembly and for storage. I think the F2A guys that come here use a mix of kerosene and 3N1 oil. Sewing machine oil would be a good substitute. They flush their engines at the end of each flying session. Sewing machine oil doesn't get gummy. I got to look at some old machines that had been sitting for years at my last job before we got rid of them and they cranked over by hand as easy as pie. It doesn't have much viscosity but gets pretty slick. I spent the last four years before retirement working on and repairing CNC multihead sewing machines. Your would be amazed at how few bearings there are in 18 head machine with 15 needles on each head. All critical lube points are either bushings and steel or steel on steel. I was really enjoying the work until Mr. Covid reared it's ugly head and gave the owner an excuse to shut the place down. You can probably buy sewing machine oil at any place that services home sewing machines but to get it in a larger quantity you need to see a supply house for custom embroidery shops.
  Type at you later,
   Dan McEntee
AMA 28784
EAA  1038824
AMA 480405 (American Motorcyclist Association)

Offline Chris Wilson

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Re: #2: Cleaning an engine for storage after using it.
« Reply #13 on: June 15, 2021, 02:34:01 AM »
Any oil with a high detergent content will do, it doesn't need to be branded ATF, sewing machine oil or Risoline.
The key is the surfactant.
Chris.
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You have enemies? Good. That means you've stood up for something, sometime in your life.
 Nothing in life is so exhilarating as to be shot at without result.  It's not enough that we do our best; sometimes we have to do what's required


Offline Chris Wilson

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Re: #2: Cleaning an engine for storage after using it.
« Reply #15 on: June 15, 2021, 04:39:26 PM »
Interestingly they state it's non  detergent but not non surfactant and I  wonder what their secret sauce is.
Of course we may never know.
Chris.
MAAA AUS 73427

You have enemies? Good. That means you've stood up for something, sometime in your life.
 Nothing in life is so exhilarating as to be shot at without result.  It's not enough that we do our best; sometimes we have to do what's required


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