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Author Topic: Crash Worthy Craft  (Read 307 times)

Offline phil c

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Crash Worthy Craft
« on: August 30, 2018, 10:16:07 AM »
A long thread in the main forum mentioned Corehouse stuff.  This is just to clarify:

For Corehouse planes-
The RST is the basic trainer and stunt trainer.  It's designed for an FP or LA 25 with the stock 20-30 muffler and an 8/4 or 9/4 prop.  It needs the muffler for training and stunt.  The motor runs better.  Without a muffler it becomes a beginner combat plane.  When trimmed out it will easily do the whole stunt pattern.
Fly over grass if possible.  Crashes on pavement are always worse.  Over 3-4inch reasonable turf it will fly straight in with no damage.  Off angle and stiff cross winds will do more damage.  It's usually easy to repair since it tends to break into a couple a big pieces that can be easily put back together with some glue and splices.

Gotcha SL-  this is a beginners/expert combat plane for <75 mph combat.  It's more maneuverable than the RST but with a muffler, or some nose weight and restricted controls it makes decent trainer and is stronger, since it's more compact.

The Gotcha Streak III is an advanced stunt trainer.  The best engine combo is an LA46 or 40 and a 3.5oz tank and stock 30-30 muffler.  Restrict the venturi to get a 6minute run- around 0.265 i.d.  A 9/4 prop(for 35-40), a 10/4(46), or a Master Airscrew 10/4 blade for the 46 work well.  For the 40 the 3 blade prop needs to be cut down to 9.5/5.  The Streak III is reasonably crashworthy but more prone to damage than the RST.  It's a big light plane- 54in span, 550 sq.in., 36in. long.  In any kind of moderate crash the fuselage will break between wing and stabilizer, a pretty easy fix.

Learning Stunt- after learning how to stay upright and turn around with the plane the next step is the maneuvers.  The Carl Goldberg trio- Shoestring, Buster, Cosmic Wind came with a leaflet on learning to stunt.  Mine is long gone but the ideas were simple.  Don't even attempt to do the stunt pattern maneuvers initially.  No five foot level laps, keep the plane up at 10-15 ft, well over the audience's heads.
         First- a wide wingover, no sharp corners, just up high, over the top, and turn with the plane.  Get used to flying up high and going up and down.  Try the old time stunt climb and dive- climb high, fly a few laps, deliberately dive back down.
         Second- Try an inside(up elevator loop).  When the wind hits the back of your head start the climb, keep holding up, the plane will start to go inverted going left to right. KEEP HOLDING UP.  The plane will tuck under and start to reverse direction.  KEEP HOLDING UP.  Slack of on the up elevator and let the plane come back to level.  The biggest mistake practically every newby makes is to try to turn the plane by raising their arm while the plane dives- straight into the ground.  Follow the plane with your arm, holding up until the plane returns to upright flight.
         Third- the lazy eight.  Start the loop.  When the plane goes inverted let it go level for a moment. Then recover to with up elevator to level flight.  Next let it turn more until it is going down.  As it goes below about 45deg consciously give it down and do a partial outside loop.
         Fourth- practice lazy eights and loops until you can do them easily.  Work into flying upside down and then doing outside loops from inverted.  Practice making them with even sized loops and lower down to get used to flying lower.  Stretch the eight out into inverted flight.
        You now know enough to start learning other maneuvers and really learn to fly.  Except for the wing over always start maneuvers when the plane is downwind.  Pay attention to any wind.  The lazy eight is really good for learning the wind.  Learn how the plane behaves when the wind hits it from different directions.
phil Cartier


Offline M Shipman

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Re: Crash Worthy Craft
« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2018, 08:40:02 AM »
Phil,
What is the price of the RST ARF?  I could not find in on your web site.
Thanks,
Mike

Offline T.J. Vieira

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Re: Crash Worthy Craft
« Reply #2 on: September 06, 2018, 05:53:03 AM »
Phil,

good breakdown!  flying one of the RST's on a fox 35, the other on an FP40 w/muffler.  the fox runs great in this plane with a 10x4 APC, and the FP with an 11x4 APC.  it is a tad porky up front with the standard muffler....  BUT, the rugged does really mean rugged!  went in inverted doing lazy 8's over grass at about 45 degrees, and only a busted prop!  My 12 yo nephew and 10 yo neice both fly the Fox powered plane with no problems at all!  great product!

Offline phil c

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Re: Crash Worthy Craft
« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2018, 09:45:55 AM »
Phil,
What is the price of the RST ARF?  I could not find in on your web site.
Thanks,
Mike

I never planned on doing an ARF.  The plane is pretty damn simple to build it hardly seems worth it.
I'll send you and email.
phil Cartier


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