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Author Topic: Saito FA 50 cam timing.  (Read 2964 times)
Phil Bare
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« on: January 22, 2011, 06:52:28 PM »

Hi all, Today I purchased a Saito FA 50 at a swap meet for what I think is a really, really good price. On the way home, I stopped at my LHS and purchased all of the parts required to go through it and  now have a question regarding cam timing and how to do it properly before I break it down. I can not seem to find the info on line.  Also, what would be a good plane for this engine. Any and all help would be appreciated.        Phil
PS. The reason that I want to go through it is to replace the bearings simply because I always do replace bearings on used and unknown engines that I intend to keep and use.
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Jim Kraft
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« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2011, 09:31:56 PM »

Hi Phil; I am not sure about the 50 Saito as I do not have one. If it is like the 56 or the others that I have, there is a mark on the cam gear that lines up with the mark on the crank gear when the piston is at top dead center. Not sure if they are all that way, but there is an oil hole in the cam shaft that lines up with either the intake lifter guide, or the exhaust lifter guide, and you can make a tool to fit in there to hold the cam gear in position while installing it on the case. Maybe some one that has one will chime in here. Anyway, there are marks on the cam gear, and the crank, the one on the crank might be a little hard to find, but if you get the piston to TDC you shoud be able to find it.
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Jim Kraft
Phil Bare
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« Reply #2 on: January 23, 2011, 09:48:16 AM »

Thank you very much Jim, I always like to have an idea of what to expect before tearing down an unknown engine. 
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RandySmith
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« Reply #3 on: January 23, 2011, 10:17:24 AM »

Phil

a couple of things that would help, you can put the engine at TDC  and mark the gears your self, If you have a digital camera, which is common now days  take close up pictures... or just wing it and have fun searching later  LOL  that is been done before too.  Certainly won't be boring that way :

I can also get whatever info you need  if it comes down to that

Regards
Randy
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Phil Bare
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« Reply #4 on: January 23, 2011, 11:02:15 AM »

Thanks Randy, I have been known to put my own 'punch marks' on things that need to be reassembled in a matching manner. I have stayed away from four strokes because of the perceived power to weight disparity compared to same displacement two strokes, but it has finaly soaked in that four strokes make just exactly the sort of steady power that stunt requires plus I bought it for a song. What would you recomend as a good sport/stunt plane for the engine?
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RandySmith
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« Reply #5 on: January 24, 2011, 01:11:50 PM »

Thanks Randy, I have been known to put my own 'punch marks' on things that need to be reassembled in a matching manner. I have stayed away from four strokes because of the perceived power to weight disparity compared to same displacement two strokes, but it has finaly soaked in that four strokes make just exactly the sort of steady power that stunt requires plus I bought it for a song. What would you recomend as a good sport/stunt plane for the engine?

Brodak P-40

Smith standard Vector

Smith Staris

Brodak Zero

just to name a few

Regards
Randy
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bill bischoff
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« Reply #6 on: January 24, 2011, 02:24:13 PM »

Here's the technique I use. Hold the crank at TDC with  some tape wrapped around the front of the case and prop drive washer. Position the punch mark on the cam straight down. Hold the cam in position with a single edge razor blade held against the bottom of the cam housing, engaged in the cam gear teeth. Carefully lower the cam assembly into place and slip the razor blade out from between the cam housing and crankcase. This only works on the "old style" cam housing. It won't apply to the newer engines where the cam sits inside a "bathtub".
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Robert Zambelli
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« Reply #7 on: January 24, 2011, 05:24:05 PM »

Here's the correct way.

Bob Z.
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Robert Zambelli
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« Reply #8 on: January 24, 2011, 05:42:27 PM »

I have a number of SAITO 50s and they're quite powerful - very close to the 56. I personally think that it's one of the smoothest running and most user-friendly SAITOs ever made.
I've had them on a number of planes and those mentioned by Randy may or may not  work.
Of those he mentioned, the only one I've flown is the P-40 and I would try it - in fact, I may put the 50 on mine.

BUT, you must keep in mind that the SAITO 50 is heavy - 16.0 ounce with the muffler. It requires 3 to 3 1/4 ounce of fuel for the pattern.
The P-40 should be a good choice as it accommodates a number of engines but you would probably have to shorten the nose by an inch or so.
I've seen a SAITO 50 powered Sig Magnum that flew extremely well.
Another plane to consider is the Stiletto.

Bob Z.
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Phil Bare
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« Reply #9 on: January 24, 2011, 06:55:50 PM »

Thanks guys for the info and suggestions, and thank you Bob for the PDF, I printed it out. I have always been some what of a P40 fan, so I think that will be the one. Bob, do you run the stock carb or do you go with a cl venturie?  Again, thanks all.        Phil
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Robert Zambelli
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« Reply #10 on: January 24, 2011, 07:43:41 PM »

Phil - I ran the stock carb, wired open and the runs were perfect.

11 1/2-6, 11 1/2-7 or 12-6 props seemed to work best.

Metal non-uniflow tanks but I'm starting to like the clunk tanks more and more.

I tried it with and without muffler pressure and could hardly tell the difference.

Bob Z.
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Phil Bare
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« Reply #11 on: January 25, 2011, 03:21:47 PM »

Again, Thanks Bob, I think that I will try the engine in a Brodak P 40 . I have often wondered what was to be gained by messing with a venturie when the carb is there and works well. I have the engine dissassembled now and will put it back togather tomarrow. It looks to be a very low time engine and even the bearings were just fine after cleaning, but I have new ones anyway.  The cam timing issue is pretty straight forward once one gets a look at the parts.      :-)       I think that it just might be the best twenty bucks that I have ever spent on an engine.     Phil
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